Changing How I Spend My Money: 4 Things That Prove I’m No Longer In My Early Twenties

​Just like most of my relationships in my early twenties, money came and went. I loved buying the trendiest clothes, eating out for ALL my meals and using my income, or lack there of, on going out every weekend. To me, the concept of money was all about spending, not investing. But as I entered my late twenties, I changed the way I thought about money. Money needed to bring me stability and I began to see it as a tool rather than the burden it always had been. As such, I began to search for ways to devote my income to investments. But, aside from a 401k, what did these real life investment pieces look like?

Clothes: Investing in quality clothes and footwear has saved me tons of money. In my twenties I would buy the latest trends, focusing on shops such as Forever 21 and H&M. These clothes would look dated in a couple of seasons and would always rip or lose their shape, which meant they would last less than a year in my closet. This type of consumption is exactly what makes the fast fashion industry the second leading pollutant in the world.

Art: My all time favorite investment is art. Not only will it possibly make me money in the future, I get to enjoy it every day in my home. Investing in art is tricky. To do it properly, one has to not only dedicate money but time to research. Getting to know a local artist community is a must as they often have insider information on up and coming artists worth investing in.

Furniture: In my early twenties all my furniture came from IKEA. Sadly, it isn’t built to last. Now I will spend the extra hundred or so on heirloom pieces. And when heirloom pieces are out of my price range, I scour estate sales and antique stores. Buying antique pieces means that not only are they built with quality materials, but they are also great conversation pieces.

Health: Just to put the cost of your health into perspective, living with diabetes costs a person an average of $13,700 each year. Your health really does have an impact on your bank account. By focusing on nutrition and exercising regularly, I am lowering my risks for future health issues, which means fewer doctor visits and medical expenses.

Regardless of how old you are, the way you spend your money matters. What might not seem like a big deal now can (and will) add up over time. By becoming more conscious of your spending habits and the big picture of your investments, you can make smarter choices that lead to a better, happier future.


​About the Author

Just like most of my relationships in my early twenties, money came and went. I loved buying the trendiest clothes, eating out for ALL my meals and using my income, or lack there of, on going out every weekend. To me, the concept of money was all about spending, not investing. But, as I entered my late twenties I changed the way I thought about money. Money needed to bring me stability and I began to see it as a tool rather than the burden it always had been. As such, I began to search for ways to devote my income to investments. But, aside from a 401k, what did these real life investment pieces look like?

Clothes: Investing in quality clothes and footwear has saved me tons of money. In my twenties I would buy the latest trends, focusing on shops such as Forever 21 and H&M. These clothes would look dated in a couple of seasons and would always rip or lose their shape, which meant they would last less than a year in my closet. This type of consumption is exactly what makes the fast fashion industry the second leading pollutant in the world.

Art: My all time favorite investment is art. Not only will it possibly make me money in the future, I get to enjoy it every day in my home. Investing in art is tricky. To do it properly, one has to not only dedicate money but time to research. Getting to know a local artist community is a must as they often have insider information on up and coming artists worth investing in.

Furniture: In my early twenties all my furniture came from IKEA. Sadly, it isn’t built to last. Now I will spend the extra hundred or so on heirloom pieces. And when heirloom pieces are out of my price range, I scour estate sales and antique stores. Buying antique pieces means that not only are they built with quality materials, but they are also great conversation pieces.

Health: Just to put the cost of your health into perspective, living with diabetes costs a person an average of $13,700 each year. Your health really does have an impact on your bank account. By focusing on nutrition and exercising regularly, I am lowering my risks for future health issues, which means fewer doctor visits and medical expenses.

Regardless of how old you are, the way you spend your money matters. What might not seem like a big deal now can (and will) add up over time. By becoming more conscious of your spending habits and the big picture of your investments, you can make smarter choices that lead to a better, happier future.


​​​Carri works as a medic for the film industry here in New Mexico while also co-running a clothing boutique with her husband in the Nob Hill district of Albuquerque. As a small business owner she understands the importance of customer relationships, branding and marketing and feels that this brings her insight and knowledge when writing for Buzzy Blogs. Even with Carri's professional obligations she still gives time to her passions for travel, baking, dining and spending time with her loved ones.

Share The Honey!

Leave a Comment: