The True Power of Financial Freedom + 3 Steps to Getting There

​I remember looking at my credit card statement a week after getting married. I was in shock at the total. This shock soon turned into anxiety, which lead to stress. I didn’t want to start my married life on the wrong foot and become a financial burden to my husband. Especially since the number one reason for divorce is finances. So I buckled down, took a good look at my debt and then made a plan.

Stop Buying:
I love clothes, interior decorating, skin care products and artisanal food and wine. With that said, it’s obvious that I am a spender. But now instead of spending money, I spend time. I spend time on what I love to do, specifically the things that cost little to no money. Instead of scouring the internet for the latest deals or shopping at antique stores I now invest my time in writing, taking my dogs for walks and exercise.

Save For What You Really Want:

When you have a goal to save you are less likely to spend money on items that you just don’t need. For me I wanted a down payment for an investment property. With this in mind, I didn’t buy new clothes for over 6 months. And when I went shopping I didn’t go just to shop as a hobby. I bought with intention. I redefined my life based on my needs rather than my wants.

Earn Extra Income
The best way I saw myself getting out of debt while still saving money was by earning extra income. And believe me, I did pretty much anything for an extra dollar. I saw myself as a 30 year old babysitter, something I hadn’t done since my teens, a house sitter and even baked for money. I also rented out my house during the holidays to my neighbors family. There was no job too small for me and by doing whatever I needed to do to get out of debt I became a more humble person.

As of now I am debt free with money in my savings account. It took a year of knowing what I needed compared to what I wanted, learning how shopping should not be a hobby and understanding that  memories are not built on material possessions. Though these lessons came about due to the anxiety I developed with my debt, ​they were lessons that I now deeply value.

I remember looking at my credit card statement a week after getting married. I was in shock at the total. This shock soon turned into anxiety, which lead to stress. I didn’t want to start my married life on the wrong foot and become a financial burden to my husband. Especially since the number one reason for divorce is finances. So I buckled down, took a good look at my debt and then made a plan.

Stop Buying:
I love clothes, interior decorating, skin care products and artisanal food and wine. With that said, it’s obvious that I am a spender. But now instead of spending money, I spend time. I spend time on what I love to do, specifically the things that cost little to no money. Instead of scouring the internet for the latest deals or shopping at antique stores I now invest my time in writing, taking my dogs for walks and exercise.

Save For What You Really Want:
When you have a goal to save you are less likely to spend money on items that you just don’t need. For me I wanted a down payment for an investment property. With this in mind, I didn’t buy new clothes for over 6 months. And when I went shopping I didn’t go just to shop as a hobby. I bought with intention. I redefined my life based on my needs rather than my wants.

Earn Extra Income
The best way I saw myself getting out of debt while still saving money was by earning extra income. And believe me, I did pretty much anything for an extra dollar. I saw myself as a 30 year old babysitter, something I hadn’t done since my teens, a house sitter and even baked for money. I also rented out my house during the holidays to my neighbors family. There was no job too small for me and by doing whatever I needed to do to get out of debt I became a more humble person.

As of now I am debt free with money in my savings account. It took a year of knowing what I needed compared to what I wanted, learning how shopping should not be a hobby and understanding that  memories are not built on material possessions. Though these lessons came about due to the anxiety I developed with my debt, it was lessons that I now deeply value.


​About The Author


​​Carri works as a medic for the film industry here in New Mexico while also co-running a clothing boutique with her husband in the Nob Hill district of Albuquerque. As a small business owner she understands the importance of customer relationships, branding and marketing and feels that this brings her insight and knowledge when writing for Buzzy Blogs. Even with Carri's professional obligations she still gives time to her passions for travel, baking, dining and spending time with her loved ones.

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